Working remotely is most people’s dream. The fact of avoiding the long commute, the traffic, the walk from the parking lot to the office every day, sounds like a dream come true. But, realistically being at home is not the best environment for some people. With all the distractions and the temptations, like laying in bed all day, sometimes having an office doesn’t sound like a bad idea.

Usually the reason why Employers hire remote workers is to avoid the cost of an office and it’s expenses. According to Boston CoBar here’s the average cost of an office.

COSTS OF OPENING A NEW OFFICE LOCATION (AVOID THESE WITH COWORKING!)

  • Time spent with brokers, attorneys, etc searching for space and negotiating leases
  • Opportunity cost of pledging future capital to lease obligations, inability to quickly scale up or down
  • $30-60K a year for additional resources to set up and manage office (ISPs, printer/copier, coffee vendors, furniture, janitorial etc) – or even worse, taking a producer away from their core responsibilities to do these tasks
  • Costs associated with scheduling conference room time, offsites that a smaller office space can’t accommodate

So, now the question is “How do I make my boss pay for a Coworking Membership?

We have some tips that might help:

Schedule a Meeting

  • Request a meeting with your Boss. Don’t go into this proposal as a casual chat by the kitchen, or on your way to the bathroom. Firmly, yet politely, as your boss if he/she has availability to meet with you in the next week (the sooner the better). Prepare and create an outline for your proposal.
  • Request at least 30 minutes of their time so they know to expect a serious conversation and if you use an internal calendar system, add your meeting as an event so both parties don’t forget the upcoming meeting.
  • Create a formal proposal of what the next months of your life look like with your job involved. How will you remain in communication? Will you have high speed internet?

Have Plan

Don’t go into it without a plan. Suggesting for your Boss to pay for something that is not in their budget is tricky, but you’ll be surprise of how open they usually are. Create a digital or printout document outlining common problems or questions regarding working remotely and have a plan of action for each obstacle.

Some aspects you will want to address include:

  • Outline your “office hours” aka will you modify your work day to be reachable in the same time zone as your company?
  • Show a list of 24 hour cafes and co-working spaces.
  • Research communication methods such as GoTo Meeting or UberConference to prove seamless reachability.
  • List the skills you will learn from from networking abroad.
  • Offer a weekly, monthly, or quarterly “catch up” session.

Do you feel ready yet?

Now that you know how to pitch the benefits of coworking, you can approach your employer with a proposition that can actually add value, instead of feeling like you’re asking for a favor or asking them for money. After all, the “trend” of coworking isn’t a trend anymore- it’s the future of work.

Get your membership TODAY!